Katherine Dillon

Arts Professor

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Katherine Dillon is a returning to the full-time faculty at ITP this year, having served on the full-time faculty from 2011-2017 and as adjunct from 2008-2011 and 2017-2019.  Classes developed and taught at ITP include: Visual Language, Designing Meaningful Interactions, Design for Change and 100 Days of Making.  Katherine also served on the thesis faculty from 2013-2017. Visual Language is part of the Comm Lab core curriculum and focuses on graphic literacy. The course aims to develop in students with no experience in graphic design the skills and confidence to communicate their ideas visually. Designing Meaningful Interactions introduces the voice of the end user into the design process and provides fundamental skills in UX/UI design. Iteration and its impact on the creative process is the focus of the 100 Days of Making class. Students identify a theme, idea or topic they would like to explore over the course of 100 consecutive days and commit to iterating on their idea every day. 

Katherine's professional experience is as a creative director with a focus on graphic design, user experience design, data visualization and information design. Her work spans print, digital experiences, video and motion graphics. She has been a partner and creative lead in 3 successful startup businesses: UncommonGoods, an e-commerce business, Dillon | Thompson, a digital media design agency, and L2 Inc., a business intelligence firm acquired by Gartner, Inc. in March 2017. Katherine started her professional career at ABC News where she served as Creative Director of Broadcast Graphics and as the founding General Manager of ABCNEWS.com. Katherine was awarded two Emmy awards for her creative work at ABC Television.

Katherine holds a a Bachelor Degree in Architecture from Cornell University and a Master of Architecture Degree from Harvard University Graduate School of Design where she was awarded the Sheldon Fellowship for post-graduate research at Cambridge University.