DPI Courses

Studio Courses

Photo & Imaging: Digital

PHTI-UT.0001 Studio 4 Credits

Fall 2017 Offerings: 

PHTI-UT.0001.001

15714

Wafaa Bilal

Wednesday 2-5:45

721 Bway, Rm. 803

PHTI-UT.0001.002

15715

Mark Jenkinson

Wednesday 2-5:45

721 Bway, Rm. 815

 

Pre-requisite: This is the first course in Photography & Imaging: Digital and Analog sequence to be taken in the first year. Open to majors only.

This is an intro class about photographic image making, digital methods of output, and basic theory addressing the cultural uses of photography. This course is designed to familiarize students with fundamental concepts and techniques of photographic equipment, processes, materials, and philosophy of digital photography. This course will familiarize students with the basic use of the camera and workings of Adobe Photoshop as well as scanning, capturing, and outputting digital images. Upon completion of the class, students will know how to digitize, edit, and/or manipulate images in Photoshop, prepare images in Photoshop for the intended output, and output images via printers and other output devices. Students will also develop basic camera and computer imaging skills. Screenings/exhibitions may be assigned as the semester progresses. The course will address the contemporary photographic culture and emphasize the development of individual voice and vision through self-directed projects and research; and the establishment of a self-sufficient working process and critical dialogue.

Photo & Imaging: Analog

PHTI-UT.0002 Studio 4 Credits

PHTI-UT.002.001   Thomas Drysdale Wednesday 2:00 - 5:45 721 Broadway, Rm. 804

PHTI-UT.0002.002

15716

Editha Mesina

Wednesday 2:00 - 5:45

721 Bway, Rm. 814

Pre-requisite: This is the first course in Photography & Imaging: Digital and Analog sequence to be taken in the first year. Open to majors only

This course examines creative expression in the context of traditional analog methodology. It is a class about seeing and translating one’s vision into images. Topics include understanding light as an expressive element in a photograph. Form, content and ideas relating to portraiture, documentary, narrative, landscape and the still life will be incorporated into assignments and discussed at length. Through a series of exercises, students will be immersed in the craft of the medium: understanding exposure and metering, the physical and chemical development of film and print materials, and the means of making fine quality enlargements. Weekly assignments are designed to help the students develop a discipline in their working habits. The weekly critiques are designed to provide students with a forum in which to give each other critical and constructive feedback. Students will view slide lectures on contemporary photography as well as photographs from the medium’s rich past. They will visit and respond to relevant gallery and museum exhibits. The aim of this course is to immerse the student in the issues and ideas that have surfaced in the medium’s 200-year history. It is the teacher’s hope to provide the students with an environment wherein they can grow as perceptive image-makers, interesting thinkers and engaged human beings. Students must also register for Friday Recitation.

Photo 3: Multimedia - Intro to New Media

PHTI-UT.0003 Studio 4 Credits

PHTI-UT.0003.001

15968

Elizabeth Kilroy

Monday 9:30 - 1:15

721 Bway, Rm. 803

Prerequisite: Photography & Imaging: Analog and Digital.

Interested non-majors must complete the non-major request form to enroll in this course.

 

For the final studio foundation level requirement, students are required to take one of any of the Photography & Imaging Multimedia courses-all of which will be conceptual, photo based courses, incorporating elements of moving image, sound and web. 

This course explores photography, visual communication and multimedia in a networked wired world. Multi-platform storytelling is giving photographers and image makers new channels of creativity in which to compose and share stories. Content creators engage in a world that is filled with multiplying technology tools, in ever more contexts and formats. Physical locations are increasingly tagged. Sensors, processors, and memory can be found in everyday objects, even clothing. Websites, i-docs, social media channels, smartphone apps and games compete for our attention with more traditional media outlets, like tv, film and newspapers. In this class we will explore how to create content for and engage in this ever changing digital landscape of ubiquitous computing as photographers, artists, documentary makers, curators and consumers of content. This studio class will allow students to engage with contemporary media options to create engaging and relevant multimedia content, on as many media platforms as make sense. We will use video, audio and photography to tell stories. We will learn how to turn our smart phones into multimedia tools. We will explore HTML5, CSS3, mapping and UX design to help us share our stories. We will explore how content reaches audiences through social media and how to shape it as curators.

Photo 3: Multimedia - Video

PHTI-UT.0003 Studio 4 Credits

PHTI-UT.0003.002

19894

Caitlin Berrigan

Thursday 2:00 - 5:45

721 Bway, Rm. 803

PHTI-UT.0003.003

  Caitlin Berrigan Wednesday 9:30 - 1:15 721 Broadway, Rm. 803

Prerequisite: Photography & Imaging: Analog and Digital.

Interested non-majors must complete the non-major request form to enroll in this course.

 

This course is intended for students who want to experiment with time-based imaging, photography, video, new media, and online durational performance. Through project development and theoretical dialogue, this course introduces the concepts, strategies, techniques, and critical issues of the visual image in the electronic context: print, animation, mixed media, video, etc. Students will learn software including Adobe Photoshop and Premiere. Creativity and problem solving are strongly emphasized. This course will also discuss pioneering artists in the field, framing a historical context and platform for project investigation. Furthermore, the core of Multimedia Imaging develops an in-depth understanding of the technical and aesthetic foundations of photography and digital technologies.

Photo 2: for Non-Majors

PHTI-UT.1002 Studio 4 Credits

PHTI-UT. 1002.001

14300

Editha Mesina

Thursday 10:00 - 1:00

721 Bway, Rm. 815

Prerequisite: Photography I or permission from the Department.  
Interested non-majors must complete the non-major request form to enroll in this course.

Photo 2 is a course that expands upon the principles and tools of Photography I. Students will start out continuing to refine analog skills through a series of short technical assignments. Students will work on exercises with on-camera flash, medium format camera, and tungsten lighting to further their technical skills. At the heart of the class is the development of two long-term projects in which students can hone their creative vision. Weekly critiques of students' projects will include discussions on content, aesthetics, editing, and technique. Class time will also be spent on slide presentations of historical and contemporary photography, technical lectures, and lab demonstrations. Students are required to have a film camera with a light meter and manual functions. A lab fee is charged for this course. Some supplies will be provided, but students will need to buy additional film and paper.

 

Documentary Strategies: Documenting Downtown

PHTI-UT.1006 Studio 4 Credits

PHTI-UT. 1006.001

 

Mark Bussel

Monday 2:00 - 5:45

721 Bway, Rm. 815

 

 

Prerequisite: Photography & Imaging: Analog and Digital.
Interested non-majors must complete the non-major request form to enroll in this course.

This course systematically examines downtown New York neighborhoods, businesses, institutions and communities. Using photography, video and audio students will document histories that have unfolded around New York University’s Greenwich Village campus: the evolution of the Bowery; changing Chinatown, the diminishing family-owned businesses; disappearing sub cultures of the East and West Village; the Stonewall generation; Italian, Jewish, and Puerto Rican enclaves in the Lower East Side. In past semesters, students have turned their finished work into projects that are then made available to the communities through Web sites, documentaries and museum exhibits. PBS, The Italian American Museum, The Archdiocese of New York, and the Two Bridges Neighborhood Council have used student’s projects produced for this course. The students learn how to work together in teams and with families and institutions, and how to gain access to other cultures. The results enter the permanent archives of New York University, ensuring that the material would be available to historians and sociologists for generations to come, preserving the people’s history of the communities, and helping bond NYU more closely to its neighbors.

Mark Bussell is a former Picture Editor of The New York Times and  of The New York Times Magazine. He worked with the Museum of Modern Art to produce the book and exhibit Pictures of the Times: A Century of Photography from The New York Times and developed strategies to turn articles from the daily newspaper into The Times’s first video and web presentations. Mark conceived and edited the award-winning book Without Sanctuary, a collection of photographs dealing with lynching in America and helped organize the accompanying exhibit at The New-York Historical Society. He has curated numerous shows in China and the United States, including the first-ever exhibition on the walls of the Basilica of St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral in New York.

 

Visual Thinking

PHTI-UT.1010 Studio 4 Credits

PHTI-UT.1010.001

13808

Cheryl Yun

Tuesday 2:00-5:45

721 Bway, Rm. 803

Prerequisite: Open to first year P&I majors and transfer students. Required for Majors, optional for transfers.
Interested non-majors must complete the non-major request form to enroll in this course.

 

Visual thinking is a foundation course in Tisch Department of Photography and Imaging designed to broaden the student’s aesthetic explorations and to inform their photography. The course will expose and explore basic visual ideas to help the student develop a visual language based on contemporary, cross-disciplinary and cross - cultural artistic strategies. Through a series of projects and exercises students will be encouraged to experiment with line, composition, scale, text/type, performance, collaboration, narrative, design, sound, software and with materials in order to develop strong tools for further awareness and visual expression.

Lighting: Theory & Practice

PHTI-UT.1013 Studio 4 Credits

PHTI-UT.1013.001

13809

Paul Owen

Tuesday 2-5:45 

721 Bway, Rm. 804

Prerequisite: Photography & Imaging: Analog and Digital or permission of the department.
Interested non-majors must complete the non-major request form to enroll in this course.

 

This course is an introduction to photographic lighting, one of the most basic and important aspects of photography. We will examine the studio environment, professional practices and location lighting situations. A series of lighting demonstrations and assignments thoroughly acquaints the student with the application and control of electronic flash and natural lighting. Students discover the creative advantages of a variety of lighting equipment, camera controls, synchro-daylight and painting with light. Color theory, color temperature and color correction are taught by utilizing film and digital mediums. Lighting demonstrations incorporated the use of analog cameras and computer-tethered digital cameras. Students may work in any genre, including but not limited to: figure, portrait, still life, fashion. A final creative portfolio is required by the end of the semester. Cameras, lighting equipment, and basic materials are provided. Students are expected to furnish additional film and supplies.

Photojournalism

PHTI-UT.1015 Studio 4 Credits

 

PHTI-UT.1015.001

13810

Jeffrey Scales


Wednesday 6:00-9:00


721 Bway, Rm. 814

Prerequisite: Photography & Imaging: Analog, Digital, and Multimedia (can be taken concurrently).
Interested non-majors must complete the non-major request form to enroll in this course.

 

This course will explore the history and evolution of photojournalism through readings, discussions, critiques, and visits from editors and photographers from the New York Times and other periodicals. The first half of the semester, students will be expected to produce weekly assignments under the pressure of deadlines. In the second half, students will focus on a longer-term narrative project. Topics will include: ethics of representation; working in different communities and cultures; the demands of a one-day feature; how to build a story; how to develop your style in a journalistic context; how to present your story ideas and your assignments to editors; the business of photojournalism.

 

Jeffrey Henson Scales is the photography editor of the The New York Times The Sunday Review and The Book Review. He is also co-editor of the annual, Year In Pictures section for both print and online editions. He curates The New York Times Sunday Review photography column, “Exposures.”

 

InDesign

PHTI-UT.1021 Studio 2 Credits

 

PHTI-UT.1021.001

14239

Cate Fallon

Friday 10:00-1:00

721 Bway, Rm. 803


Prerequisite: Photography & Imaging: Digital or knowledge of Photoshop. The course will run for the first seven weeks of the Fall 2017 semester. Non-majors must complete the non-major request form to enroll in this course.

 

This course is devoted to an understanding of the design and production of a photo book or magazine. On the first day of class, students should bring in digital versions of the art they plan to translate it into a printed piece. While the course will focus on multi-page print design, students will explore InDesign and learn how to use the program to create a publication, deciding on the size and order of image and where text will go. In the second week of course students will work with type. We will explore how to make type work for you and what typefaces work best depending on your design and art. We will also discuss image pacing and the flow of text throughout a publication. In the third session, layouts are reviewed and InDesign files are revised if needed. The course then turns to production. We will go over each file and make it as final as possible and ready for print. The course will discuss the different ways to get your document published and how to do each one. In the beginning of this course the students will walk into the classroom with a loose body of work and leave with their work organized into a printable book format.

 

Typography

PHTI-UT.1021 Studio 2 Credits

 

PHTI-UT.1021.001

14287

Astrid Lewis

Friday 10:00-1:00

721 Bway, Rm. 803


Prerequisite: Knowledge of InDesign suggested.  Non-majors must complete the non-major request form to enroll in this course. The course will run for weeks 8-14 of the Fall 2017 Semester.

 

Typography is important and understanding how to use type can make a huge difference in how you work and how you design. Through in-class projects, slide shows, and fun assignments you will learn the history of type, how to use type to your advantage, and you will create printed objects that show a deep understanding of how type works.

 

Large Format

PHTI-UT.1014 Studio 4 Credits

This course is not offered for the Fall 2017 Semester.

Prerequisite: Photography & Imaging: Analog and Digital.

Many artists turn to 4x5 and 8x10 large-format cameras for the creative control that view cameras afford, as well as for the high resolution and potentially large scale of the resulting prints. This course introduces the special characteristics of large format photography, including perspective control, creative approaches to selective focus and metering strategies facilitated by single negative processing. The exposure and development methods known as the Zone System will also be considered. Because large format work is physically demanding and relatively slow, this is also an opportunity to work more deliberately and, in some respects, more consciously. It may also inform one’s understanding of the methods and approaches of 19th and early 20th Century artists. The high resolution of large format description can often produce a compelling image of relatively static subject matter that might not otherwise succeed if recorded in smaller formats. Surfaces and details evoke a more “complete”, or even tactile appreciation of some subjects. Following a series of practical exercises during the first half of the course, students are expected to develop an appropriate project on which to concentrate and apply their evolving skills in the production of an original and integrated body of work. Technical material covered includes different large format camera types and applications, lenses and optics, metering, filters, special B&W developers, large format printing and scanning for digital output. Early historical processes are introduced, current exhibitions of artists and photographers in New York are discussed and field trips are arranged. A variety of cameras, lenses and tripods are available for student use. A lab fee is charged for this course. 

Design Boot Camp

PHTI-UT.1020 Studio 4 Credits

This course is not offered for the Fall 2017 Semester.

Prerequisite: Photography & Imaging: Multimedia or permission by the Department.

This is an intense design class for the crossover creature who yearns to design their own exhibit, create a street poster, develop an ad campaign, design titles for a film, invent a visual identity for a musical score, etc. This will be a hands-on process-driven class that will push you to imagine, create, and produce. Students must know InDesign.

Directed Projects: Portraiture

PHTI-UT.1030 Studio 4 Credits

This course is not offered for the Fall 2017 Semester.

Prerequisite: Photography & Imaging: Analog and Digital. Course repeatable for credit.

Photographers have used portraiture to reveal a certain beauty or truth within their subject. This course will explore traditional and non-traditional approaches to making a portrait through slide lectures, museum and gallery visits, and relevant readings. Students will focus on the development of a body of work that mines the idea of the portrait. The class will explore issues in portraiture including beauty, identity, truth, and artifice. In addition, demonstrations and discussions will deal with lighting, camera format, and project presentation. The course will address the use of text, video, and other media to expand upon traditional notions of the portrait. Critiques and discussions will focus on improving technique, editing, and developing one’s content. Slide lectures will include photographers from the medium’s rich past as well as contemporary photographers working in portraiture. The class seeks to develop in the student a greater understanding of his/her own image making and the potential of the portrait.

Directed Projects: Process & Practice: Creating Sacred Space

PHTI-UT.1030 Studio 4 Credits

PHTI-UT.1030.001

14417

Erika DeVries

Thurs. 9:30-1:15

721 Bway, Rm. 814

 

Prerequisite: Photography & Imaging: Analog and Digital.Non-majors must complete the non-major request form to enroll in this course.

 

This course explores the concept of the sacred in images.  Beginning with looking inward and then pulling back to reveal in steps direct communities & spaces then further out into overall interconnectedness.  We will focus on the concept of sacred space and reverence or irreverence in relation to spaces and being.We will do this work by exploring the connections between visual art making, technical processes, materials, and personal motivations. Students will spend time reviewing, researching and interviewing artist’s regarding their art making practice and process. Students will also focus on the creation of one semester long visual art project for the class and investigating/documenting his/her process in making that project. Students will learn through physically assisting each other on projects, discussing and reviewing other artist’s work and through their own art making. The aim of this class is to shift focus from the final visual project as “goal” into examining what it is that one finds pleasure and satisfaction in doing and applying that to what one does. This exploration is in relation to making visual art but also in application to larger life choices, creating personal and communal sanctuary, and contemplative practices.

 

Directed Projects: Archive-Inspired Projects

PHTI-UT.1030.002 Studio 4 Credits

Prerequisite: Photography & Imaging: Analog, Digital, and Multimedia (can be taken concurrently) or Department Permission. Course Repeatable for Credit.   

This course explores the artistic possibilities of working on archive-based projects. Six classes are devoted to field trips to visit archives throughout the city such as The Fales and Taminent Collections at NYU, The New York Times Photo Archive “The Morgue,” The NY Public Library Picture Collection, Visual AIDS, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and The Museum of Modern Art. Student interest helps determine the sites that we visit. We also explore numerous online archives. Each student works on a self-designed semester long project in any media that has an archival component or involves archival research. Students can work with images from archives we visit or any archives or collections (personal or public) they may have access to. Bi-weekly work-in-progress critiques accompany discussions of contemporary and historical art works and assigned readings. Modes of working and presentation are also explored.

Archival images have been an important source and inspiration for many contemporary artists’ projects such as White Women 1915-2015 and Unbranded by Hank Willis Thomas, Evidence by Mike Mandel and Larry Sultan, Pictures from Home by Larry Sultan; Kurdistan: In the Shadow of History by Susan Meiselas; Man with a Movie Camera: A Global Remake by Perry Bard; The Atlas Project by Walid Raad; Gerard Richter’s Atlas; From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried by Carrie Mae Weems, The Rephotographic Project of the American West, Cory Arcangel’s Arnold Schoenberg, op. 11 - II - Cute Kittens, and various projects by Alan Berliner, Christian Boltanski, Sarah Charlesworth, Milagros de la Torre, Sanja Ivekovic, Wangechi Mutu, Alfredo Jaar, Michael Lesy, Annette Messager, Clarissa Sligh, Jo Spence, and Penelope Umbrico.

See www.afterlifeofimages.tumblr.com for more information.  Contributions are from Lorie Novak and Archive Inspired Projects Fall 2016 and Spring 2015.

This is an interdisciplinary studio course and students have full access the Photography & Imaging’s facilities. A lab fee is charged. For more information, please contact lorie.novak@nyu.edu.

Senior Directed Projects

PHTI-UT.1201 Studio 4 Credits

 

PHTI-UT.1201.001

PHTI-UT.1201.002

PHTI-UT.1201.003

13811

14165

13812

Tom Drysdale

Lorie Novak

Wafaa Bilal

Tuesday 9:30-1:15

Tuesday 9:30-1:15

Tuesday 9:30-1:15

721 Bway, Rm. 804

721 Bway, Rm. 814

721 Bway, Rm. 815


Required of all DPI Seniors. 

 

In this intensive critique course, students produce their senior thesis project for exhibition in the spring

semester. Students are encouraged to use any photo-based method or approach that can best serve their individual ideas and directions. Later emphasis will be on refining and editing each project, with assistance in determining a final completed form. Critical emphasis will encourage the development of personal vision and project forms that best serve specific choices. Students will be expected to challenge themselves and each other to delve deeper with their work and take risks. On the first day of class, students must bring a past project and be prepared to present their project ideas.

 

Business of Art

PHTI-UT.1100 Studio 2 Credits

This Course is not offered for the Fall 2017 Semester

This class will attempt to demystify the questions and decisions young artists face when choosing a profession in the arts. Central to the course is understanding an artist’s creative growth and lifestyle choices are inextricably entwined with his/her financial security. Young creative professionals need to realistically assess their future goals and aspirations in order to find their niche in the worlds of both art and commerce, while supporting their larger creative vision. This class is largely a survey of the many career choices available to artists. Topics covered will be: graduate schools, careers in teaching, editorial, advertising, stock and corporate photography, art buying and photo editing, photo assisting, galleries, artist’s residencies, grants and fundraising sources, portfolio preparation and marketing resumes. The class relies heavily on guests from the publishing, business and art world, giving students the chance to show their work to, and elicit advice from, top industry professionals.

Advanced Lighting

PHTI-UT.1202 Studio 4 Credits

PHTI-UT.1202.001

16088

Mark Jenkinson

Tues. 2:00-5:45

721 Bway, Rm. 804

Prerequisite: Lighting or permission by the Department. 

From Gregory Crewdson to David LaChapelle, photographers are making images that are increasingly complex in their production techniques- rivaling those of Hollywood films. This class picks up on the skills students have learned in basic lighting and allows them to develop a body of work that utilizes more complex lighting and production skills. The class begins with a series of demos and assignments designed to challenge and hone the students existing skills and transitions into a directed project of the students choice later in the semester. Students may work on any project/portfolio they choose, from fine art to fashion, with an emphasis on using light consistently throughout the body of work to convey a unified vision. Students are encouraged to have the broad ideas for a project/portfolio before registering for the class. Topics covered will be: Advanced lighting techniques/light shaping, casting talent/crew, production organization, special effects, RAW image conversion, shooting/lighting on location, and special lighting techniques for documentary projects. This course requires a nonrefundable lab fee.

Advanced Documentary Strategies

PHTI-UT.1216 Studio 4 Credits

PHTI-UT.1216.001

15914

Joe Rodriguez

Tues. 6-9:45

721 Bway, Rm. 814

Prerequisite: Photojournalism I or the equivalent experience.

Beginning photojournalists develop a project, and acquire the practical knowledge to enter the profession. Students will work with a director of photography to develop a long-term project with an eye-toward publication (print, blog, self-published). Students will develop an idea; consider similar projects/competition; research appropriate publications/outlets for their work; craft a pitch; present to editors; explore alternative modes of production and distribution; and learn about practical business considerations (representation, rights, etc).
Students should come to the first meeting with a one-page project proposal in hand. There is a lab fee charged for this course. Students should email tischphoto@nyu.edu to be enrolled in this course. The email should list relevant experience or courses taken that fulfill the prerequisite.

Advanced Digital Printing

PHTI-UT.1236 Studio 2 Credits

PHTI-UT.1236.001 

15853

Karl Peterson

Fri. 2:00-5:45

721 Bway Rm. 803

Prerequisite: Photography Analog & Digital or permission by the Department. Please note, this is a seven-week workshop and runs weeks 8-14.

Advanced inkjet printing and color management workshop. This course will cover fine inkjet printing techniques and color management techniques for both color and black and white printing. Topics will include profiling devices, neutralizing greys in Photoshop, correct use of paper profiles, proofing, building custom profiles, and an understanding of how lighting conditions affect print viewing. This will be a technical class, with a mix of lectures, demos, and printing sessions.

Advanced Photoshop

PHTI-UT.1260 Studio 2 Credits

PHTI-UT. 1260.001

16089

Catherine Fallon

Fri.9:30-1:15

721 Bway, Rm. 803

Offered Spring only. Prerequisite: Photography & Imaging III.

Through demonstrations and hands-on instruction, students will learn how to further control and expand their use of Photoshop - emphasis will be on photographic concerns, of tonality and color control as well as exploring the creative potential of constructing images from photographic source material and graphic design principals. A brief review of basic concepts and file formats and a discussion of workflow including the integration of the enhanced Adobe Bridge will start the semester. We will review color correction and various selection refinements. Layering and layer masks will be extensively examined and we will touch on collage methods. We will also look at automating routine actions to streamline your workflow. A thorough review of camera RAW image processing for greater control and retention of highlights and shadow detail will also be included. This course requires a nonrefundable lab 

Anatomy of the Book

PHTI-UT.1400 Studio 4 Credits

 

PHTI-UT.1400.001

13814

Yolanda Cuomo

Wednesday 9:30-1:15

721 Bway, Rm. 803


Offered Fall only. Prerequisite: Juniors and seniors only. Interested Non-majors must complete the non-major request form to enroll in this course.

 

This class conceives and produces the senior catalog. The workshop nature of the class stresses collaboration and experimentation. Lectures include topics such as making type beautiful, process as place, being a visual scavenger. In addition to exploring the creative process, workshops in Indesign, type design, photo editing, and pagination will be taught throughout the semester. Students will learn the craft and execute a handmade book. After the design process is completed, students begin the production process: choosing paper, constructing digital files, coordinating with a printer, and working out printing budgets.

 

Yolanda Cuomo, art director, designer and educator, has collaborated for over two decades with both visual and performing artists including Richard Avedon, Paul Simon, Twyla Tharp, Laurie Anderson, Gilles Peress, and Sylvia Plachy. Her studio designed and produced the worldwide exhibition and book, Diane Arbus Revelations, the first major retrospective of Diane Arbus’s photography since 1974. Recent studio projects include the book Performance: Richard Avedon; design of the exhibit Invasion 68: Prague, photographs by Josef Koudelka at the Aperture Gallery, New York; design of the book Access to Life for Magnum Photos; identity graphics for the LOOK3 photo festival in Charlottesville, Virginia; art direction of Aperture magazine, and CR magazine.

 

Drawing: An Introduction

PHTI-UT.1031 Studio 2 Credits

PHTI-UT. 1031.001

19407

Paul Owen

Mon. 6-8:30

721 Bway, Rm. 804

Working from the idea that drawing is fundamental to all image-making, this course will begin with an introduction to the basics of drawing, such as line, value, form and spatial relations. Students will work in class from still life set-ups and figure drawing from the model. In-class work time will be supplemented with discussion and slide lectures to introduce historic and contemporary examples of drawing. The course will also include explorations of the expressive, experimental and conceptual aspects of drawing as a medium. This course requires a nonrefundable lab fee.

Internship

PHTI-UT.1300 Studio 1-4 Credits

 

PHTI-UT.1300.001

___

Mark Jenkinson, Faculty advisor

   

 

Prerequisite: Open to DPI Juniors and Seniors only.


Juniors and seniors gain valuable work experience and insight into the professional world through this opportunity that bridges the academic and professional worlds. Students have been enrolled in internships at museums, art galleries, commercial photography studios, major publications and with artists. Faculty advisor Mark Jenkinson facilitates the internship placement with regard to the student's interests as well as ensures the educational propriety of the work. Credits vary according to the nature of the placement.


Students are registered by the department upon receipt of a signed Internship Agreement Form. A maximum of 6 credits total in Internship is allowed during your student career. Repeatable multiple semesters

Critical Studies Courses

CHIPS (Culture and History of Imaging Photography Studies)

PHTI-UT.1003 Lecture & Recitation 4 Credits

 

PHTI-UT.1003.001

13806

Isolde Brielmaier

Thursday 9:15–12:15

721 Bway, Rm 804

         

Prerequisites: Open to DPI Majors only. Students must also register for PHTI-UT 1003.002.

 

(Act 1 of 2) Offered Fall Only. Required of all freshmen majors and highly recommended for incoming transfers. Students are required to register for the lecture and the recitation sections. No prerequisites for this course. The course will consist of a series of weekly lectures, discussions, readings and field trips to museums and galleries in the city. Lectures will present historic and contemporary art and photography and it's ideation as a basis for understanding the work the students are viewing on their weekly field trips. Students will visit selected exhibitions chosen for their quality and relevance and arranged by geographic area of the city (One week the Whitney, the next Chelsea, etc). Students will be required to monitor the daily press and periodicals for reviews of work they've seen and to highlight exhibitions the class should see. Additional readings of historic material will be assigned and short papers will be required.

 

CHIPS Recitation

PHTI-UT.1003

Lecture 

0 Credits

   

PHTI-UT.1003.002

_____

_____

Friday 10:00-1:00

721 Bway, Rm 804

(Act 2 of 2) Offered Fall Only. Required of all freshmen majors and highly recommended for incoming transfers. Students are required to register for the lecture and the recitation sections. No prerequisites for this course. The course will consist of a series of weekly lectures, discussions, readings and field trips to museums and galleries in the city. Lectures will present historic and contemporary art and photography and it's ideation as a basis for understanding the work the students are viewing on their weekly field trips. Students will visit selected exhibitions chosen for their quality and relevance and arranged by geographic area of the city (One week the Whitney, the next Chelsea, etc). Students will be required to monitor the daily press and periodicals for reviews of work they've seen and to highlight exhibitions the class should see. Additional readings of historic material will be assigned and short papers will be required.

 

The Social History of Photography

PHTI-UT.1101 Lecture 4 Credits

 

PHTI-UT.1101.001

14322

Christopher Philips

Wednesday 10:00-1:00

721 Bway, Rm 804

 

Open only to Photography & Imaging majors, sophomore standing.

 

This class will chronicle the history of photography?s complex and symbiotic relationship to the other visual arts: painting, sculpture, architecture, installation and performance, among others. Beginning with the medium’s invention and the early fights of its practitioners to establish themselves as fine artists, the course will describe photographers? unique attempts to negotiate their relationships with both artistic movements and the media culture of which they are a part. Robinson, Cameron, Emerson, F. Holland Day, Stieglitz, Moholy-Nagy, Rodchenko, Weston, Alvarez Bravo, Lartigue, De Carava, Cahun, Robert Frank, Diane Arbus and Cindy Sherman (among others) will be seen within the context of their respective art worlds, so the impact of art movements, cultural attitudes and new technologies on photographers during different historical periods can be assessed.

 

The Aesthetic History of Photography

PHTI-UT.1102 Lecture 4 Credits

Not Offered Fall 2017

Open only to Photography & Imaging majors. Sophomore Standing.

This class will chronicle the history of photography's complex and symbiotic relationship to the other visual arts: painting, sculpture, architecture, installation and performance, among others. Beginning with the medium?s invention and the early fights of its practitioners to establish themselves as fine artists, the course will describe photographers? unique attempts to negotiate their relationships with both artistic movements and the media culture of which they are a part. Robinson, Cameron, Emerson, F. Holland Day, Stieglitz, Moholy-Nagy, Rodchenko, Weston, Alvarez Bravo, Lartigue, De Carava, Cahun, Robert Frank, Diane Arbus and Cindy Sherman (among others) will be seen within the context of their respective art worlds, so the impact of art movements, cultural attitudes and new technologies on photographers during different historical periods can be assessed.

Arts Writing: Rendering Photography

PHTI-UT 1118 Lecture 4 Credits

PHTI-UT.1118.001

 

Harris

Wed. 9:30-12:30

721 Broadway, 815

Prerequisites: Social or Aesthetic History of Photography (can be taken concurrently). DPI majors:  juniors and seniors only. Interested non-majors must complete the non-major request form to enroll in this course.

A writing course with the larger aim of getting students to be more critical viewers, and hence possess a more convincing voice - whether conveying, describing, analyzing, challenging, and/or critiquing what they see. In class, for the entire semester, students take on their photographer’s persona — they will give lectures about their photographer, and then more in their photographer’s voice, about what mattered to their photographer (based on assignments); they make work based on their photographers that influenced their vision. The professor would like students to go deep into someone else’s sensibility…such as Diane Arbus, Weegee, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Roy Decarava, Claude Cahun, Man Ray…  among others.

 

Advanced History Seminar: Decolonizing Vision

PHTI-UT.1120 Lecture 4 Credits

 

PHTI-UT.1120

Lecture 

4 Credits

   

PHTI-UT.1120.001

20667

Deborah Willis

Monday 2:00-4:45

20 Cooper

Prerequisites: Social or Aesthetic History of Photography (can be taken concurrently). DPI majors:  juniors and seniors only. Interested non-majors must complete the non-major request form to enroll in this course.

The central concern of the course ​“Decolonizing Vision” is to explore the ways in which racial, imperial, and settler colonial regimes of power instantiate regimes of vision that determine what we see, how we see, and how we are seen. We will consider how the legitimacy and authority to rule and regulate particular populations has been inextricably linked to the concomitant power to visually survey these populations and the landscapes they inhabit. We will explore how colonial modernity’s abiding legacy is the institution of a way of seeing, and hence knowing, that obscures the intimacies of imperial, racial, and settler colonial projects as they produce racial, gendered, and sexual subjectivities.  The course “Decolonizing Vision” places black diasporic visual culture and its engagement with the histories of transatlantic slavery in the Americas in relation to the intertwined histories of US and European projects of empire and settler colonial conquest in Asia, Africa, Australia, and the Middle East. Most importantly, we identify “decolonial visual practices” that speak to these submerged, co-mingled histories, and that point to their continuing resonance in the present. Through a sustained examination of queer, black, and feminist decolonial visual practices in particular, this course seeks to explore alternative ways of both seeing and knowing capable of challenging the scopic and sensorial regimes of colonial modernity and its afterlives. The scope of this class spans multiple geographic areas, historical periods, and genres.

Contemporary Photography: Photo Now

PHTI-UT.1130 Lecture 4 Credits

Not Offered Fall 2017

Prerequisites: Social and Aesthetic History of Photography.

Digital technology today allows the combination of still images and moving images with unprecedented ease. As a result, the boundaries that once existed between still photographers, filmmakers, and videomakers are becoming increasingly blurred. By examining a wide range of visual materials, both historic and contemporary, this class will attempt to understand the changing relation between the still photographic image and the moving image. We will concentrate on three major areas:

1.     We will examine the rarely seen films made by celebrated still photographers such as Paul Strand, Man Ray, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Robert Frank, William Klein, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Helen Levitt, and Susan Meiselas.

2.     We will consider a number of classic films and videos that make innovative use of the still photograph, the freeze-frame image, and the static camera. These filmmakers include Dziga Vertov, Agnès Varda, Jean-Luc Godard, Federico Fellini, Andy Warhol, Chris Marker, Hollis Frampton, Bill Viola, and James Benning.

3.     We will discuss a selected group of contemporary artists whose work imaginatively embraces both still photographs and moving images. These artists include Isaac Julian, Douglas Gordon, Lorna Simpson, Stan Douglas, Eyal Sivan, Tracey Moffat, and David Claerbout.

Throughout the class, we will explore an unusually wide range of visual materials: still photographs, photo books, feature films, avant-garde films, documentaries, and artists' films and videos. Class readings will introduce a range of critical approaches to the relation between the still and moving image, and will also highlight key works and visual innovators.

Christopher Phillips is the curator at the International Center of Photography, New York. He has formerly been senior editor at Art in America. He was also the curator of the 1998-99 traveling exhibition Voices at Witte de With, Rotterdam; Fundacio Miro, Barcelona; and Le Fresnoy, Tourcoing, France as well as the co-editor of the exhibition catalogue, published by Witte de With, Rotterdam. Christopher was also the author of Steichen at War (1981); coauthor of The New Vision: Photography Between the World Wars (1989); and editor of Photography in the Modern Era: Documents and Critical Writings(1989). He has had articles published in October, Art in America, Guggenheim Magazine, and Plaszm. He was part of the curatorial team that organized the exhibition Cosmos: From Romanticism to the Avant-Garde at Musee des Beaux-Arts, Montreal and which also traveled to Barcelona and Venice. Christopher has also published an article on the Viennese electronic art group, Granular Synthesis ("Machine Dreams," Art in America Nov. 1999) and a report on the Istanbul Biennial ("Band of Outsiders," Art in America, Apr. 2000).

Visual Culture Colloquium

PHTI-UT.1650 Lecture 4 Credits

 

PHTI-UT.1650.001

14305

Isolde Brielmaier

Thursday 2:00-4:45

721 Bway, Rm 814


Prerequisites: Open to DPI juniors and seniors only;

 

This course focuses on the work, practices and perspectives of working photographers and photo professionals. Invited guest speakers include photographers and photo specialists from a range of photo related fields including contemporary art, commercial advertising, fashion, editorial, documentary and photojournalism. An emphasis will also be placed on those working with new media in its various forms. These guests will speak about their own work and process while critically assessing and exploring their position within the broad field of photography today. Several individual exhibition/field visits are also expected.

 

Registration and pre-requisites for Non-Majors

For Open Arts courses (see below) and Photo 2 for Non-Majors, students may register directly in ALBERT. Non-majors with the proper prerequisites may be able to enroll in the other courses listed below as space permits.

Students who have not taken an intro course within our department, or are not able to enroll directly on ALBERT must fill out the Non-Majors Course Request Form.

Be sure to include any relevant course experience in the notes field. 

Submitting this form places you on an in-house waitlist only, and does not guarantee that you will be enrolled in a Photography & Imaging course. If a course is available, you will be contacted with instructions on how to enroll. Please do not expect to be contacted until close to the start of the semester. Non-major waitlists are tracked separately from Albert’s online course info (such as open seats or availability).

All photography courses apply toward electives for Non-Photography & Imaging TSOA majors. A lab fee is assessed for all Photography & Imaging studio classes.  The department reserves the right to drop any student who does not attend the first class.

Please contact the Department with registration questions or problems.

tischphoto@nyu.edu

212-998-1930

Open Arts & Courses for Non-Majors

Photo 1: Non-Major

OART-UT 0011 Studio 4 Credits

A basic black-and-white photography course designed for those with little or no experience in photography. Emphasis is placed on the application of technique in terms of personal expression through the selection and composition of subject matter. Class size is limited, providing for a greater degree of individual critique and classroom participation. The course comprises technical lectures, darkroom demonstrations, slide lectures on historical and contemporary work as well as class critiques. Each student must have a camera with manually adjustable aperture and shutter speeds. A lab fee is assessed by the University Bursar for this course.  The department reserves the right to drop any student from a course who does not attend the first class. Please note there is a non-refundable lab fee for this class. Photography & Imaging majors may not enroll in this course. 

Digital Tools

OART-UT 0823 Studio 4 Credits

This course will explore the basic tools of digital imaging. During the semester we will cover the 3 main adobe products for creative imaging - Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign. Through a series of short weekly assignments we will look at various graphic design and layout ideas using Illustrator and Indesign. We will also touch on the wealth of image enhancement and manipulation techniques afforded by photoshop. Several small assignments will introduce the basics of scanning, printing and compositing images drawing on the strengths of the individual pieces of software. Students will have the opportunity to complete a small project of their own for the end of the term. Class time will be divided between lectures, critiques, and work in progress sessions. This course is not intended to completely cover the software listed, but will give students a fundamental understanding of the possibilities of digital imaging.