Danielle Peers

Visiting Assistant Professor, Spring 2019

Danielle Peers

Danielle Peers is a Visiting Professor in Performance Studies at Tisch School for the Arts, and an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation at the University of Alberta. Peers earned their Masters and Doctorate degrees at the University of Alberta, specializing in adapted physical activity and physical cultural studies. They completed their Banting Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Department of Communication Studies at Concordia University, with a focus on research-creation and critical disability studies.

Peers’ research mobilizes critical disability, poststructuralist, and arts-based approaches to theorize disability movement cultures and performance. This work has spanned diverse contexts, including the Paralympic games, crip performing arts, nationalist spectacles of ‘tolerance,’ and the everyday gestural vocabularies that constitute both illness and inspiration. Recent (co)publications include: “Cramping our style: Critical disability studies as axiological affinities” in Disability Studies Quarterly; “Wrongful inheritance: Race, disability and sexuality in Cramblett v. Midwest Sperm Bank” in Feminist Legal Studies; “Interrogating disability: The (de)composition of a recovering Paralympian” in Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health; and “Moving materiality: People, tools, and this thing called disability” in Art/Research International. Peers also co-edited a special issue of the Canadian Journal of Disability Studies, entitled “Telling ourselves sideways, crooked and crip.” Peers has been invited to give over 60 academic and public keynote lectures, including research-creation performances for several international conferences. Peers is currently working on a monograph with UBC Press entitled Spectacular Tolerance: Disability, Physical Fitness, and the White Canadian Nation, which traces how national investments in performances of inspirational disability build on white supremacist, colonial and eugenic traditions. Peers’ is a dancer, choreographer, performance artist, video artist, and an Artistic Associate with the Edmonton dance company CRIPSiE. Peers has also curated two crip art exhibitions and screened five of their videos at international film festivals. Notably, their short video Gimp Bootcamp has screened at over 40 juried film festivals, including the Frameline International LGBT Film Festival, and the disTHIS! Film Series at NYU. Peers’ artistic and academic work critically leverages their experiences as a Paralympic bronze medalist and world champion in wheelchair basketball.

Peers’ research is currently funded by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Their graduate and post-doctoral research has earned them three of Canada’s most prestigious graduate and post-graduate awards: the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship; the Trudeau Foundation Scholarship; and the Banting Postdoctoral Fellowship. Further, they have received numerous awards for their work in knowledge translation, advocacy, and community leadership.