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Spring 2017 Salon Series Part II

We invite you to attend the second iteration of our student-run Salon Series featuring Performance Studies scholars! To continue the spirit of PRAXIS, the Salon Series gives students the opportunity to lead interactive workshops or present their scholarly research in the spirit of a skill-share.

This week's Salon Series features Avon Bashida (MA '17), Troizel Carr (MA '17), Joanna Evans (MA '17), and Kristen Holfeuer (MA '17).

Avon Bashida's lecture "Power of Triptych" will focus on the investigation of the triptych. She will showcase her personal work, which involves the force of three, to address how the mind cannot help but to place objects or people in the perception of continuity, when experienced next to each other.

Troizel Carr's lecture is titled "unsettle me: a meditation on sex in the under/commons." this paper wishes to meditate on how we might locate sexuality in the under/commons. though discourse about surfaces and the haptic have come to the forefront in recent years, it seems as though conversations about how these things configure with sex have significantly buckled under the weight of mastery. if we believe that the haptic has potential between the surfaces of skin, then sex is the performance of the haptic and surface aesthetics joining across a landscape of subjectivity and objectivity. what does it feel like when objects touch? sex, as theorized in this paper, might show up in the under/commons because it decomposes our senses of self causing us to always couple (and triple and quadruple) into folds of relationality and sensuality. alongside light touches with these questions and topics, this paper hopes to be an experimentation with academic form and performance as only a paper can do for itself and not for or through its reader.

Joanna Evans' performance titled "The Year is 3000" circles around all sorts of things - impossible futures, fractured memories, intimacy/solace in small familiarities, sex between bodies that no longer cohere. But its also very simply, directly, intimately written.

Kristen Holfeuer's lecture titled "Prairie-Making: A Chronological List of Things I Did (While I Was Trying To Do Something Else)" asks the essential question: What do you make while nobody is watching (but it's a small town so really everybody is watching)? This lecture, as she states, is a crash-course in prairie theatre-making techniques and community building strategies.