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Summer Sessions

Tisch School of the Arts offers summer courses to all NYU and visiting undergraduate students. This is an opportunity for students to take courses in New York City to complete degree requirements or pursue personal interests in various artistic disciplines. Courses are offered for credit and noncredit. 

Visiting students interested in taking courses during the summer should complete the visiting student application.

Note: Non-credit (NCRD-UT) courses cannot be applied towards a degree.

You can view our course allocations here.

Summer Session I: May 22 - July 2, 2017

Bronx as HERstorical Heritage: Arts, Activism & Gentrification

OART-UT 970 / NCRD-UT 970 / 4 units

05/22/2017 - 07/02/2017. Mon, Wed 10.00 AM - 1.45 PM with Seyi Adebanjo.

This class is an exploration of the Bronx as historical heritage.  What are the different cultural and political locations in the Bronx and who are the community agents and members who make the Bronx what it is? As the Bronx is transforming due to gentrification and as the media and developers are making poverty sexy to attract the gentry, what stories and memories does the space hold? We will excavate the people’s continuous fight to stay in the Bronx. How have communities, artists, and activists maintained cultural institutions and art in the face of systematic oppression?

Students will have the opportunity to visit different locations in the Bronx and to interact with cultural-political institutions and community agents/members. Through site visits, guest lectures, class discussions, screenings, and workshops, students will gain a refined perspective on the Bronx and its social/cultural/historic contexts.  Topics to be covered include: gender representation in Hip Hop, sexuality, culture and identity as organizing tools, and art as activism, with a special focus on land organizing and womyn.

Fundamentals of Developing the Screenplay

OART-UT 35 / NCRD-UT 9035 / 3 units

05/22/2017 - 07/02/2017. Tue, Thu 6.00 PM - 9.15 PM with William Sheldon Woodbury.

The course combines lectures on the basics of feature length screenwriting with the development of the student’s own writing work. Students are required to complete 50-70 pages of a full length screenplay with an outline of the rest. The students study story structure, conflict, and character, in conjunction with the screening and study of several classic films and screenplays. The writing process starts in the first month with a focus on exercises to help students develop five story ideas with the complexity and depth to sustain a full-length screenplay. One of these ideas will serve as the basis for the required work. Each idea can be described in one or two paragraphs. Special instructions: All students must come to the first class with three ideas for full-length screenplays.

Fundamentals of Filmmaking I: The Art of Visual Storytelling

OART-UT 560 / OART-GT 2560 / NCRD-UT 560 / 4 units

Section 001: 05/22/2017 - 06/11/2017. Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 9.30 AM - 4.45 PM with Eric Juhola.

Sectoin 002: 06/12/2017 - 07/02/2017. Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 9.30 AM - 4.45 PM. Instructor TBD.

This practical workshop is designed to introduce students to the techniques and theory of developing and producing short film ideas that are shot on digital video and edited digitally on computer using Adobe Premiere Pro Software. The course centers on learning elements of visual storytelling through a spectrum of aesthetic approaches. Working in crews of four, students learn directing, shooting, and editing skills as they each direct three short videos (three to five minutes in length).

Understanding Story

OART-UT 568 / NCRD-UT 568 / 4 units

05/22/2017 - 07/02/2017. Wed, Thu 5.30 PM - 9.00 PM with Rosanne Limoncelli.

Understanding Story is a class composed of lectures, discussions, screenings, readings, critical and creative writing, group critiques and presentations. The course is designed to expose the student to the fundamental principles of storytelling across a spectrum of mediums, including the written story, playwriting, film, poetry, dance, games, photography, fine art and music. How do all these different art forms tell stories? How can the student apply what is learned to their own creative work? History and theory of story will be studied and used to inspire personal and creative work in order to better understand how story can most successfully be expressed in different mediums and reach its audience.

Producing Essentials

OART-UT 1006 / NCRD-UT 1006 / 4 units

05/22/2017 - 07/02/2017. Mon, Wed 2.00 PM - 5.45 PM with Leon Falk.

Today’s major creative fields—film, television, music, theatre, dance, and new media—need quality producers. A producer with a firm knowledge of the craft, a discerning eye for material, fund-raising ability, a grasp of the law, cash flow, people, and ethics is rare. This course provides students with a framework for understanding the dynamics of producing—as an art form and a business profession—and for completing a creative product in the entertainment and media industries. Students are introduced to the basic concepts, terms, and principles that apply to the role of producer in the entertainment and media industries along with the specific job functions that are required to effectively and efficiently complete a production.

Film Development: Tools of Creative Movie Producing

OART-UT 1010 / NCRD-UT 9510 / 4 units

05/22/2017 - 07/02/2017. Mon, Wed 6.00 PM - 8.30 PM with Hardy Justice.

This course de-mystifies the film development process and teaches students the key tools necessary for a successful career as a film executive or producer.  This course will chart the key stages of finding and preparing a good script for production. These steps include how to find, evaluate and shape material from the producer's perspective. Students will learn the practical art of writing script coverage and notes, as well as how to establish a tracking group and develop tracking reports for new material. Other topics include the role of key players in the process, such as agents and studio executives, and how to avoid "development hell."

Playwriting Practicum

OART-UT 1040 / NCRD-UT 8040 / 4 units

05/22/2017 - 07/02/2017 Mon, Wed 6.00 PM - 9.50 PM with Elizabeth Olesker. (This class will meet for 10 total sessions: 5/24, 5/31, 6/5, 6/7, 6/12, 6/14, 6/19, 6/21, 6/26, 6/28.)

An introductory course on the basic techniques employed in writing a play. Class includes discussion of samples of the students’ work in addition to discussion of theory and various theatrical exercises. Students read selected plays to enhance discussions of structuring a dramatic piece of writing. The course addresses actors writing material for themselves and focuses on character and dialogue as well as examining scene work, outlining, and the completion of a first draft of a one-act play. This course counts towards Theatre Studies requirements for Drama students and as elective credits for other TSOA students.

Fundamentals of Acting I

OART-UT 1924 / OART-GT 2924 / NCRD-UT 1924 / 4 units

05/22/2017 - 07/02/2017. Tue, Thu 1.30 PM - 5.15 PM with Stephen Michaels.

An introduction to the central tools and skills that make up the actor’s art and craft. Through theatre games, structured improvisation, and beginning scene work, students will exercise their imaginations, learn how to work as an ensemble, and develop a sense of their bodies as expressive instruments. All techniques covered have been developed by the most celebrated 20th century theorists, such as Stanislavski, Grotowski, and Bogart, and are the same theories that underlie the training of the Tisch undergraduate acting conservatory. No prior experience necessary. Not open to Tisch Drama Majors.

Urban Arts Workshop: New York

OART-UT 1925 / OART-GT 2925 / NCRD-UT 9511 / 4 units

05/22/2017 - 07/02/2017. Tue, Thu 6.00 PM - 9.30 PM with Scott Bankert.

This course will be composed of lectures, slide shows, screenings, readings, field trips, field assignments, written reactions, discussion and blogs, as well as visits from guest speakers and artists designed to expose students to the key concepts and fundamental theories of urban studies, public art and the urban-inspired works of many great artists and writers based in New York City. Each week another “form” of urban art will be investigated, including discussions about and encounters with street photography, graffiti, sculpture, installation art, dance, performance art, parkour (freestyle street gymnastics), gorilla theater, art vandalism and underground art, urban sound projects, large-scale projections, poetry, essays and short stories with an aim to understand how such art forms came into being and how they express a distinctly urban message to the inhabitants and visitors of New York City. The instructor seeks to combine the critical and theoretical with the experiential and personal in order to lead students to a deeper and more fruitful relationship with their city, the arts and themselves.

Summer Session II: July 3 - August 13, 2017

Site Specific to Immersive Dance Theater: Choreographing For Unconventional Formats and Spaces

OART-UT 810 / OART-GT 2810 / NCRD-UT 810 / 2 units

07/03/2017 - 08/13/2017. Tue, Thu 10.00 AM - 1.30 PM, with instructor Danielle Russo.

In this course, New York City – from its celebrated urban expanse to its lesser-known gems – will be our studio and our stage. There is no better way to experience the city than by immersing your body and your art into its many diverse landscapes. Site-Specific to Immersive Dance Theater: Choreographing for Unconventional Formats and Spaces is a research-to-practice course reconsidering the function, philosophy and reality of an evolving stage, choreographic process, and performing body. Not only is New York a conduit for local to international dance and theater, but it is also a safe space for artists to resist the norm and re-imagine models for making. Students will have the opportunity to create original choreographies on Governors Island, Brooklyn Museum and alongside Third Rail Projects’ "Then She Fell." Past experience in movement and/or performance training is not required.

 

Media Moguls in the 20th Century

OART-UT 562 / NCRD-UT 562 / 4 units

07/03/2017 - 08/13/2017. Tue, Thu 9.00 AM - 12.20 PM with Hardy Justice.

This course attempts to track the American entertainment industry from its plebian origins through its rise to becoming the predominant mass entertainment culture in the world. Students discover the origins of the production practices that are employed in the entertainment industry today by following the legendary characters, movie moguls, and media titans of the early 20th century and the companies they built. The emphasis is on the way the visionaries of the time impacted seemingly risk-averse systems to invigorate and sometimes completely revolutionize them. These innovative men and women include, but are not limited, to Louis B. Mayer, George Lucas, Maya Deren, Shirley Clark, Nam Jun Paik, Lucille Ball, Russell Simmons, Clive Davis, Julie Taymor, and Steve Jobs.

Making Webisodes

OART-UT 569 / OART-GT 2569 / NCRD-UT 569 / 4 units

07/03/2017 - 07/23/2017. Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri 10.00 AM - 1.45 PM with William Tunnicliffe.

Making Webisodes is an intensive course which combines lectures and workshops in which students create unique and compelling content for the web and then learn how to post that content on the web. Students will explore the basics of film production and online webisode distribution, working with - concept creation - writing - directing - acting - production design - camerawork - sound - editing - online tracking tools and social media - web monetization and advertising. The webisode is an exploding new art form. Web series, embedded ads, 5 second hooks, snapchats, vines and viral videos all present a variety of new media approaches within the entertainment industry, business, lifestyle, and politics. Webisodes are short visual presentations that either entertain us, directly sell us product, indirectly sell us product, or shock and engage our perspective, as in political propaganda videos. Lectures provide students with an overview of the emerging web series industry, concentrating on how the webisode is used to hook the audience, generate hits, and drive customers to websites and/or online advertising. Workshops then employ practical exercises to help the students conceive and create their own unique webisode, which can be narrative or non-narrative, fiction or non-fiction, experimental or satire, personal or political. The goal is to use the resources at hand and create instant media – webisodes. As the students produce their webisodes, they will learn by doing and they will be provided with practical knowledge of the art, craft, and commerce of webisodes.

Modern Dance: Mind, Body, Knowledge, Expression

OART-UT 804 / OART-GT 2814 / NCRD-UT 804 / 2 units

07/03/2017 - 08/13/2017. Mon, Wed 10.00 AM - 12.20 PM with Joy Kellman.

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of Modern Dance technique that focuses on the dynamic rapport between body-mind knowledge and expression. In movement, students will become more aware and organized in their bodies. They will explore certain aesthetic characteristics that help to define dance material as “Modern” or contemporary. Through structured improvisation and teamwork approaches students will learn to dance from the inside out, exercise choice with imagination and work together as an ensemble. Ultimately, students will gain an appreciation for the expressive capacity of the body, recognizing shared, unifying attributes and those that are unique and intrinsic to each individual. The thorough warm up places an emphasis on breath and proper placement for safe practices and well being. It includes floor work, stretching and strength exercises and patterns that incorporate elements of Bartenieff Fundamentals. Short dances / sequences will be learned to sharpen knowledge of the Modern Dance lexicon and increase facility for translation of weight, space, time and energy ideas. All levels are welcome. No previous dance experience is required.

Intro to Digital Tools

OART-UT 823 / OART-GT 2823 / NCRD-UT 823 / 4 units

07/03/2017 - 08/13/2017. Tue, Thu 10.00 AM - 1.45 PM with Catherine Fallon

This course will explore the basic tools of digital imaging. During the semester we will cover the 3 main adobe products for creative imaging - Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign. Through a series of short weekly assignments we will look at various graphic design and layout ideas using Illustrator and Indesign. We will also touch on the wealth of image enhancement and manipulation techniques afforded by photoshop. Several small assignments will introduce the basics of scanning, printing and compositing images drawing on the strengths of the individual pieces of software. Students will have the opportunity to complete a small project of their own for the end of the term. Class time will be divided between lectures, critiques, and work in progress sessions. This course is not intended to completely cover the software listed, but will give students a fundamental understanding of the possibilities of digital imaging.

Producing Essentials

OART-UT 1006 / NCRD-UT 1006 / 4 units

07/03/2017 - 08/13/2017. Mon, Wed 5.30 PM - 9.00 PM with Elizabeth Elsass

Today’s major creative fields—film, television, music, theatre, dance, and new media—need quality producers. A producer with a firm knowledge of the craft, a discerning eye for material, fund-raising ability, a grasp of the law, cash flow, people, and ethics is rare. This course provides students with a framework for understanding the dynamics of producing—as an art form and a business profession—and for completing a creative product in the entertainment and media industries. Students are introduced to the basic concepts, terms, and principles that apply to the role of producer in the entertainment and media industries along with the specific job functions that are required to effectively and efficiently complete a production.Today’s major creative fields—film, television, music, theatre, dance, and new media—need quality producers. A producer with a firm knowledge of the craft, a discerning eye for material, fund-raising ability, a grasp of the law, cash flow, people, and ethics is rare. This course provides students with a framework for understanding the dynamics of producing—as an art form and a business profession—and for completing a creative product in the entertainment and media industries. Students are introduced to the basic concepts, terms, and principles that apply to the role of producer in the entertainment and media industries along with the specific job functions that are required to effectively and efficiently complete a production.

Writing the TV Sitcom

OART-UT 1045 / NCRD-UT 9045 / 4 units

07/03/2017 - 08/13/2017 Tue, Thu 2.00 PM - 5.45 PM with Donald DeMaio.

Adapted from the Dramatic Writing Program’s popular “Introduction to the Sitcom” course, this intensive scriptwriting class answers the question, “What do I need to break into TV writing?” – the student will be guided through the step-by-step development of an episode for an ongoing TV sitcom, from premise line to one-page outline, to pages and revisions. The course will require the completion of a polished draft while introducing students to the rigors of professional standards through weekly story goals.

OART-UT 1045 Writing the TV Sitcom 

Adapted from the Dramatic Writing Program’s popular “Introduction to the Sitcom” course, this intensive scriptwriting class answers the question, “What do I need to break into TV writing?” – the student will be guided through the step-by-step development of an episode for an ongoing TV sitcom, from premise line to one-page outline, to pages and revisions. The course will require the completion of a polished draft while introducing students to the rigors of professional standards through weekly story goals.

OART-UT 1045 Writing the TV Sitcom 

Adapted from the Dramatic Writing Program’s popular “Introduction to the Sitcom” course, this intensive scriptwriting class answers the question, “What do I need to break into TV writing?” – the student will be guided through the step-by-step development of an episode for an ongoing TV sitcom, from premise line to one-page outline, to pages and revisions. The course will require the completion of a polished draft while introducing students to the rigors of professional standards through weekly story goals.

OART-UT 1045 Writing the TV Sitcom 

Adapted from the Dramatic Writing Program’s popular “Introduction to the Sitcom” course, this intensive scriptwriting class answers the question, “What do I need to break into TV writing?” – the student will be guided through the step-by-step development of an episode for an ongoing TV sitcom, from premise line to one-page outline, to pages and revisions. The course will require the completion of a polished draft while introducing students to the rigors of professional standards through weekly story goals.

Fundamentals of Acting I

OART-UT 1924 / OART-GT 2924 / NCRD-UT 1924 / 4 units

07/03/2017 - 08/13/2017. Mon, Wed 1.30 PM - 5.15 PM with Stephen Michaels.

An introduction to the central tools and skills that make up the actor’s art and craft. Through theatre games, structured improvisation, and beginning scene work, students will exercise their imaginations, learn how to work as an ensemble, and develop a sense of their bodies as expressive instruments. All techniques covered have been developed by the most celebrated 20th century theorists, such as Stanislavski, Grotowski, and Bogart, and are the same theories that underlie the training of the Tisch undergraduate acting conservatory. No prior experience necessary. Not open to Tisch Drama Majors.